Friday, 17 April 2015

Low FODMAP diet on a budget

By Dr Jane Varney (Monash Research Dietitian)
PhD, BNutrDiet / BHealthSci (ExerciseSci)


Finding your low FODMAP diet a bit pricey? Well you’re not alone - buying specialty products adds considerable expense to your weekly food bill. A quick price comparison of lowest unit prices (AU$ per 100g) at one of Australia’s leading supermarkets shows:
  • Low lactose milk cost over twice that of regular cow’s milk
  • Gluten free bread is 7 times more expensive than regular wheat bread
  • low FODMAP breakfast cereal (quinoa flakes) costs almost 8 times more than the cheapest high FODMAP breakfast cereal (home brand weetbix).
So how can you save a few dollars while sticking to your low FODMAP diet? Here are 10 TIPS to get you started!


1. PLAN YOUR MEAL & COOK IN BULK
It is a far more effective use of your time to get three meals out of a cooking episode than one and much cheaper. Leftovers can be eaten for lunch the next day or frozen in snap-lock bags. Snap-lock bags keep food fresh and save freezer space compared to tupperware. 

Use the app when shopping
2. EAT LEFTOVERS & CARRY WATER BOTTLE
Bring leftovers to work for lunch and carry a water bottle with you. Buying lunch and drinks on the run is expensive, whereas bringing both from home can save bucket loads.

3. WRITE A LIST & SHOP AFTER A MEAL
We’ve all done it, but shopping on an empty stomach is ASKING for a basket full of unnecessary, unhealthy purchases. Writing a list also gives you the opportunity to check the cupboards to see what you REALLY need. 

4. MAKE SHOPPING FUN
Make a morning of it - meet a friend and grab a coffee at your local farmers market. Shopping for fruit, veggies and meat at fresh food markets can be considerably cheaper AND if you visit at the end of the day, food is often heavily discounted. Fresh food markets also avoid the temptation of supermarket aisles laden with tempting, but expensive and unhealthy processed foods…win win! 

5. USE FROZEN VEGGIES & BERRIES 
They’re generally much cheaper than fresh varieties and just as nutritious! They also reduce waste if you don’t get a chance to eat them that week.

6. SAVE MONEY ON MEAT
Lean minced meat and tinned fish such as salmon and tuna are cheap, very nutritious and versatile. Meat-based meals can be bulked up with veggies, stretching them out further and cooking one vegetarian meal per week can save a few dollars. Choose a low FODMAP protein source such as quinoa, egg, tofu, canned lentils or canned chickpeas instead of meat!

7. ENJOY EGGS
They’re quick and easy to turn into a meal; naturally low FODMAP; nutritious, and very cheap (even the cage-free, happy chicken variety!)

Over 80 Low FODMAP recipes in the app
8. CHOOSE WISELY
Choose naturally low FODMAP foods such as rice and potatoes. Unwashed potatoes are generally cheaper, while buying in bulk can save, save, save! 

9. DIY
Try making your own low FODMAP muesli and/or low lactose milk. 
There’s a fantastic muesli recipe in OUR APP and low lactose milk is easy to make and half the cost of pre-prepared low lactose milks. Simply add drops containing an lactase (an enzyme that digests the lactose) to regular cow’s milk and leave the milk for 24hrs before consuming. Lactase drops are available over the counter at most pharmacies. 

10. STOCK UP WHEN PRODUCTS ARE ON SPECIAL
Non-perishables (e.g. tinned fish, tinned tomatoes) can be stored in the pantry for months, while many non-perishables (e.g. low FODMAP bread) can be frozen and used for toast. 

…just think what you could do with the savings!!
Good luck & if you think of any other tips, please comment below or tweet #FODMAPBudgetHack to us @MonashFODMAP 


5 comments:

  1. making your own gluten free bread is easy and cheap, many recipes if you google. buying in bulk saves heaps there are some online stores where you can buy large quantities, just google bulk and the ingredient you want.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Linda, thank you for your comment. Buying in bulk online is definitely also another great way to save money.

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  2. Hi Jane,
    Can we use the same trick with lactase to treat fresh cream? What does rate would you suggest?
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Donna,
    Yes you can use the same trick, whether it is milk, cream or yoghurt. Just remember to leave it in the fridge for 24hrs before consuming. For enzyme dose, we suggest following the instructions on the packaging, but also compare the lactose content on the ingredients list of cream, to that of milk. That will give you a good guide if dose amount is not clear. E.g. if milk = 5 drops of the enzyme for 100ml of milk, have a look at the lactose content of the milk then compare that to the cream. There are many creams on the market, so worth checking the nutrition panel. Thanks for your comment.

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete